Tag Archives: carrots

Winter crops are coming

Yes, celery root and parsnips are making an appearance on our table at the farmers’ market this week. We’re all longing for cooler, wet weather. Wandering around the fields this early evening, I am speechless for the beauty.

The crop of beets (red, gold and chioggia) look lush. Should begin to harvest in a few weeks.

The crop of beets (red, gold and chioggia) look lush. Should begin to harvest in a few weeks.

Parsnips were harvested out of this row for tomorrow's market.

Parsnips were harvested out of this row for tomorrow’s market.

Paul's reluctant to pose for me, too busy.

Paul is reluctant to pose for me, too busy.

The romaine this week was huge!

The romaine this week was huge!

Leeks dashes

Leeks dashing across the ground

Brocoli

Brocoli and cauliflower

I promise there are small carrots coming. This is the next 6 beds.

I promise there are small carrots coming. This is the next 7 beds.

Aren't these brassicas Amazing!

Aren’t these brassicas Amazing!

A little creek planting, to slow down the water. Looking ahead toward rain.

A little swale planting, to slow down the water. Looking ahead toward rain.

The onion baby bed

The onion transplant bed

Artichokes

Artichokes

Next week's Little Gems.

Next week’s Little Gems.

Chocolate brown pasilla peppers. Dry them for a traditional mole sauce.

Chocolate brown pasilla peppers. Dry them for a traditional mole sauce.

The low field has been cover cropped.

The low field has been cover cropped.

Pumpkins to sell tomorrow

Pumpkins to sell tomorrow


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Fall is coming on strong, as the summer crops peak. What to do? Just work a little harder, longer and stronger, knowing that rain will come, things will slow down. There will be time next to the wood stove, with a book and a cup of tea. But for now, it’s go, go, go. So glad we are up to it. And thanks to everyone that works for us or buys produce from our farm. We couldn’t do it without you.

Today we were presented with a beautiful fall day, lots of big fluffy clouds, lilting through a big sky, over hill and dale, casting moving shadows on the undulations below. With just a hint of moisture, as the clouds misted the fields, dampening the dust, sweetening the soil and doubling the scents. It’s teaming with life out there!

These kabocha winter squash are close to harvest.

These kabocha winter squash are close to harvest.

Shallots dry under a big oak.

Shallots dry under a big oak.

Rhazes, our new red little gem lettuce

Rhazes, our new red little gem lettuce

Brasiccas ready to go out into the field.

Brasiccas ready to go out into the field.

Yellow wax beans

Yellow wax beans

Rosa bianca eggplant

Rosa bianca eggplant

Lots of San Marzano roma tomatoes, perfect for sauce.

Lots of San Marzano roma tomatoes, perfect for sauce.

We've been gapping with our beet crops, but these are almost big enough to harvest.

We’ve been gapping with our beet crops, but these are almost big enough to harvest.

Celery and fennel, first planting.

Celery and fennel, first planting.

Fennel and celery root, next planting

Fennel and celery root, next planting

Broccoli

Broccoli

Picchu berries, a new crazy delicious berry, we're trialling.

Picchu berries, a new crazy delicious berry, we’re trialling.

Cherry tomatoes are dropping.

Cherry tomatoes are dropping.

Leeks and onions

Leeks and onions

Carrots in the foreground. It didn't rain enough to keep the irrigation from happening.

Carrots in the foreground. It didn’t rain enough to keep the irrigation from happening.

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That’s Farming

Red Butter Lettuce with exposed burned edges

Red Butter Lettuce with exposed burned edges

For the second week in a row, we have lost our planting of Red Butter lettuce to a pervasive burn which effects the edges of the leaves. It looks beautiful, until you start to pull it apart. We will face a lot of disappointed customers at the markets, but luckily have other lettuces to offer. The burn seems to correspond to heat during certain parts of the growth cycle.

The old saying, “Don’t put all your eggs into one basket” comes to mind right now. The farm has lots of baskets and they are full of many summer crops. Take a look:

This week's ruined Red Butter crop in the center. Last week's failed crop on the left.

This week’s ruined Red Butter crop in the center. Last week’s failed crop on the left.

The full crew picks beans.

The full crew picks beans.

Asparagus in frond stage

Asparagus in frond stage

Melons

Melons

Tomatoes are beginning to color.

Tomatoes are beginning to color.

Just harvested pea shoots

Just harvested pea shoots

The first row of of a new crop of carrots was picked today.

The first row of of a new crop of carrots was picked today.

Garlic chives are flowering.

Garlic chives are flowering.

Cloudy skys over the winter squash field. The plants are taking off, but not yet flowering.

Cloudy skys over the winter squash field. The plants are taking off, but not yet flowering.

The yellow raspberries are in full production.

The yellow raspberries are in full production.


Summer crops are almost here!

IMG_5935Today’s sky was unusual for around here. The thin clouds hung around all day, allowing for a very easy-on-the-eyes day and a perfect day to take pictures. And since it’s been a month since my last post, this is long overdue. I apologize for my absence. My unorganized self is fully to blame.

Garlic chives in bud

Garlic chives in bud

Winter squash field

Winter squash field

Picked over beans, in the foreground. The next crop is flowering in the background.

Picked over beans, in the foreground. The next crop is flowering in the background.

Shaggy asparagus

Shaggy asparagus

Couldn't resist two watermelon pictures...

Couldn’t resist two watermelon pictures…

Sugar baby melon

Sugar baby melon

Two charentais melons

Two charentais melons

Allysum, marigolds and tomatillos

Allysum, marigolds and tomatillos

The first tomatoes are sizing up!

The first tomatoes are sizing up!

Flowering cilantro is humming with bees.

Flowering cilantro is humming with bees.

Onion beds are such an extraordinary color.

Onion beds are such an extraordinary color.

Sunflower sprout flats, after harvest.

Pea shoot flats, after harvest. We’ll harvest the soil too.

Shishito peppers are quite a bit shorter than their more famous cousin, the pardon. And full of flowers.

Shishito peppers are quite a bit shorter than their more famous cousin, the Padron. They’re full of flowers.

Red raspberries

Red raspberries

Watering the carrots deeply

Watering the carrots deeply

Lettuce and frisee with corn, tomatoes and sunflowers in the distance.

Lettuce and frisee with corn, tomatoes and sunflowers in the distance.


New Spring Crops

First tomatoes

First tomatoes

First and second planting of peppers

First and second planting of peppers

Napa cabbage

Napa cabbage

Potatoes

Potatoes

Harvested carrot bed

Harvested carrot bed

Farm tools

Farm tools

Sage

Sage

Changes happen fast around here. Our second market of the week opened this week, Tuesday, with much fanfare and commotion. We had a busy and successful night. Thanks to all for coming and supporting us and all the vendors. We look forward to another great season.

We are growing some new varieties this year including a new English pea called Penelope (ahhh). It sports a densely packed pod of small, sweet peas, most picturesque. Also, to fan the kale-craze flames, a broader leafed kale called Rainbow Lacinato kale.

Rainbow lacinato kale

Rainbow lacinato kale

Penelope

Penelope

The farm stand will open soon. Still haven’t set a date, but the decor has been planted.

Farm stand is planted...

Farm stand is planted…


Busy Spring

IMG_5555The words “busy” and “spring” are synonymous on a farm.

Fields are drying quickly and the cover crop wants to be “harvested” and turned into the soil, creating an instant carbon boost helping with fertility and soil structure. Once mowed the debris from the crop digests for several weeks or until it’s structure is all but gone allowing the finished bed to be even and smooth.

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Furrows help dry the soil.

The cover crop consists of bell beans, austrian peas and oats.

The cover crop consists of bell beans, Austrian peas, barley and oats.

Then the field will be rototilled. Sometimes when a field is tilled, the soil moisture is still too high to plant. To speed drying, furrows are made with shovels on the tractor.

Once a field is flat and weed-free, it’s ready to be planted. And there are many transplants lined up waiting for space.

Transplants and irrigation supplies

Transplants and irrigation supplies

The whole crew works the plantings. The irrigation has to be set up. Most everything is on drip lines which have to be pulled and hooked up to the water supply. Some crops require covers. For example, the first tomatoes and peppers (Padron) are in and covered.

Additionally, many things are being harvested at this time of year, adding to the day’s diversity and the community’s health. We are so happy to be able to grow this excellent food.

The artichokes are finishing.

The artichokes are finishing.

These carrots are just beginning to be harvested.

These carrots on drip lines are just beginning to be harvested.

Asparagus harvest today

Asparagus harvest today

Picking peas and sage in flower

Picking peas and sage in flower

Raspberries with lava beans in the background

Raspberries with fava beans in the background

The first peppers in the field have their own greenhouses to give them a little boost.

The first peppers in the field have their own greenhouses to give them a little boost.

Spring purplette onions

Spring purplette onions

 

Even the sweet peas at home are growing like crazy.

Even the sweet peas at home are growing like crazy.


Planting Carrots

Tools are lined up. The artichokes are being given a soaking in the background.

Tools are lined up. The artichokes are being given a soaking in the background.

It’s a beautiful day. As Christmas approaches, we are collecting our thoughts and preparing to take a few days to devote to our family and friends. For me, that means baking cookies, planning menus and moping the floors.

For Paul, that means planting carrots.

Garlic and leeks are next to the open beds, ready for the carrot seeds.

Garlic and leeks are next to the open beds, ready for the carrot seeds.

This planter will plant three rows of carrots to a bed.

This contraption will plant three rows of carrots to a bed.

The seeder in action, first dropping seeds, then the basket-like wheels roll over the seed, covering it with soil.

The seeder in action, first dropping seed, then the basket-like wheels roll over the seed, covering it with soil and tamping it down.

These beds will grow us carrots ready in the spring.

These carrots will be ready in the spring.

Conveniently next to the carrots being planted are 5 beds of carrots almost ready to pick.

Conveniently, next to the carrots being planted are 5 beds of carrots almost ready to pick.

We’re so excited to be hosting Christmas for the first time ever. Lots of my family are coming to town, spending time in Sonoma. We’re all avid cooks and this is certain to become a wonderful holiday to engage and enjoy each other. It’s sure to live on in my old memory bank as well.

This sprouting broccoli is thriving after the very cold weather. Other varieties of broccoli have really suffered.

This sprouting broccoli is thriving after the very cold weather. Other varieties of broccoli have really suffered.

lettuces


Summer

The next carrots are looking lush

The next carrots are looking lush.

Oh yes, Summer is here.

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Rows of tomatoes are finally bearing fruit.

There are so many changes on the farm. Let me share just a few. The season is just getting started.

Celery root is up and pushing.

Celery root is up and pushing.

Winter squash is setting fruit.

Winter squash is setting fruit.

Onions drying under a giant oak.

Onions drying under a giant oak.

Cracked melons litter the field. You can smell their sweetness.

Cracked Charentais melons litter the field. You can smell their sweetness.

The foreground field has a turned-in summer cover crop (buckwheat). It's digesting nicely.

The foreground field is digesting a turned-in summer cover crop of buckwheat. 

 

 


Summer

Yikes! We’re 3 days into summer and rain is predicted. Possibly more than an inch over the next couple of days. That is a very unusual forecast for this spot on the globe at this time of the year. The impact for the farm and the crops is minimal though the moisture will certainly encourage weeds to germinate all over the place. Formerly clean beds will need attention before the crop is over run with something unwanted.

Paul mows down a summer cover crop on June 13th.

Paul mows down a summer cover crop on June 13th.

This is where the summer cover crop was mowed 2 weeks ago.

Same field today after 10 days “digesting”.

Watermelons are sizing up!

Watermelons are sizing up!

Love the Little Gems

Love the Little Gems

This crop of beans is in our new field and has almost no weeds!

This crop of beans is in our new field and has almost no weeds!

7 beds of carrots are germinating beautifully

7 beds of carrots are germinating beautifully

The carrots we are picking now are delicious

The carrots we are picking now are delicious

Cleaning up the radishes with a wheel hoe.

Cleaning up the radishes with a wheel hoe.

Looks like the seed ran out on this row of radishes. Should be ready in a few weeks.

Looks like the seed ran out on this row of radishes. Should be ready in a few weeks.

Even on a grey day, the bees are busy.

Even on a grey day, the bees are busy.


Pushin’ in February

Peas

Peas

So much is happening. The weather, the great dictator of what happens on the farm, has been very generous to us. It must have been over 70 degrees F. today. Beautiful. We’re planting spinach, turnips, radishes, lettuce, pea seeds in the field. Once planted, some are covered. We may plant beets and carrots this week.

Tomato seedlings

Tomato seedlings

The greenhouse is starting to really fill up with freshly planted flats, some covered, some not. The first planting of tomatoes have blasted out of their flats and pushed the remay into puffy pillows. So have the peppers. Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbages, fennel and onions were all started in the greenhouse flats last week or before.Greenhouse

Lettuce, chard, kales and collard are all being transplanted. Once in the field, they are also covered to insure against wild weather swings. We hope they will feel secure enough to take off.

Covered beds and open ground

Covered beds and open ground

Sprinklers

Running the water

The irrigation system is engaged with the warm dry weather. The final bit of field turning is almost complete as the pipes are hooked up.Pipe

There is an experiment in the new field with planting oats, wheat and barley, side-by-side. Which will be the most beneficial to this soil? We’ll see.

Wheat, Barley and Oats

Wheat, Barley and Oats

The Farm Stand signposts are all that remain of last summer's bounty.

The signposts are all that remain of last summer’s Farm Stand.

Brussels sprouts, covered bed and beyond the farm

Brussels sprouts, covered bed and beyond the farm

 

Daikon radishes are being harvested out of the cover crop between the rows of regrowing artichokes.

Daikon radishes are being harvested out of the cover crop between the rows of regrowing artichokes.


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