Tag Archives: peas

Hello again…

I am amazed I have not posted in such a long time. I am sorry to jump over months of farm activity.

This year, as always, we have much less produce coming out of the fields, than at other times of the year. We’re running into shortages at the market, running out of salad crops within an hour of the start. Beds in the field are damp and cold, not conducive to plant growth. But ground is drying and things are being planted. Our tables will again be full in a month or so. Let me catch you up, visually.

Fava beans are blooming madly.

Fava beans are blooming madly.

This crop of artichokes is especially delicious. Hope you can get some at the market while they last, another month or so.

This crop of artichokes is especially delicious. Hope you can get some at the market while they last, another month or so.

Yesterday's brassica planting

Yesterday’s brassica planting

This crop of Red Butter Lettuce should be on our market stand next week.

This crop of Red Butter Lettuce should be on our market stand next week.

Kales

Kales

Peas in full flower. We'll have sugar snaps and English shelling peas this year.

Peas in full flower. We’ll have sugar snaps and English shelling peas this year.

Second planting of peas

Second planting of peas

Paul is very busy this spring.

Paul is very busy this spring.

Baby lettuces

Baby lettuces

The greenhouse is  wonderful place to work on a blustery day.

The greenhouse is wonderful place to work on a blustery day.

Advertisements

June’s here…

…and changes continue.

IMG_5676There is so much to see, as one walks around the farm right now. Spring crops are finishing up. The asparagus is growing up and beginning to “frond”. It will continue to send up wiry, ferny stems until late in the fall, when it yellows and dries out. January or February next year, the bed will be “cultivated” or cleaned-up and spears will begin emerging in February or March.

Bye-bye chives...

Bye-bye chives…

We’ve had a spectacular crop of shelling peas this year. (I’ve even been able to put some in the freezer. Feels like money in the bank, they are that good.) The peas are almost done, beginning to dry in their pods. Another thing that is finishing for us is Salad Mix. We don’t grow a mix in the summer. It saves the crew having to fit that labor intensive task into their Tuesday and Thursday, while there are so many other things to pick. The salad mix is a wonderful convenience for our customers and we love it ourselves, but a break gives us the chance to look forward to Salad Mix coming back in the fall, to practice patience for produce we love. Beginning tomorrow, head lettuces will have to do.

There are a number of crops right around the corner … Romenesco (a green cauliflower with a most unusual shape), raspberries, potatoes and cucumbers, basil, raspberries, green beans …

IMG_5694

German butterball potatoes are flowering like crazy.

IMG_5693

Romanesco grows on an enormous plant.

IMG_5691

The white cauliflower seems like a prize, all wrapped up.

IMG_5684

Cucumbers are crawling.

And what will take up so much time in the coming months, you may ask? What will be on the menu in our household and others’ in our community and beyond? Standard summer fare with a few curveballs thrown in to keep everyone on our toes, to keep those routines from becoming a rut. There are naturally tomatoes, peppers and eggplant, melons and beans,  even some sweet corn this year, surprise, surprise!

Our farm stand opens on Saturday, June 14th. Lots of buzz and as much as we love sharing all the bounty, we’re relishing the last few weekends without it. The summer hustle is about to begin!

This bed of just planted shallots is growing on buried drip line, a refinement we hope will save precious water.

This bed of just planted shallots is growing on buried drip line, a refinement we hope will save precious water.

 

The first planting of tomatoes has been staked

The first planting of peppers have been staked. These padrons grow so tall, and they are rather fragile. Staking keeps them from tipping over and breaking.

 

Peppers are flowering and have been staked for support.

The first planting of tomatoes and have been staked for support.

 


New Spring Crops

First tomatoes

First tomatoes

First and second planting of peppers

First and second planting of peppers

Napa cabbage

Napa cabbage

Potatoes

Potatoes

Harvested carrot bed

Harvested carrot bed

Farm tools

Farm tools

Sage

Sage

Changes happen fast around here. Our second market of the week opened this week, Tuesday, with much fanfare and commotion. We had a busy and successful night. Thanks to all for coming and supporting us and all the vendors. We look forward to another great season.

We are growing some new varieties this year including a new English pea called Penelope (ahhh). It sports a densely packed pod of small, sweet peas, most picturesque. Also, to fan the kale-craze flames, a broader leafed kale called Rainbow Lacinato kale.

Rainbow lacinato kale

Rainbow lacinato kale

Penelope

Penelope

The farm stand will open soon. Still haven’t set a date, but the decor has been planted.

Farm stand is planted...

Farm stand is planted…


Picking Peas

IMG_3427_1_1We’re pretending it’s Easter today. We have spent Easter with my parents for years. My mom loves to decorate her house with a fabulous collection of baskets and eggs, chickens and rabbits, tucked into sweet, surprising corners of their lovely house. But my mom is not up to it this year, recovering from some surgery and we are making due on our own.

Our household includes my son Quinten, who has recently moved into our house. He’s been invaluable, helping with anything and everything, cooking, picking, packing and selling. We are so glad to have him share our lives.

IMG_3433_2_1I decided to have peas with the rest of the meal. We sold all that were picked yesterday at the farmers’ market, so I took the opportunity to pick them myself. I must preface this with I don’t do any of the field work for mostly practical reasons. But I love to do it. The peas were loaded with flowers and pods. Quite quickly I narrowed my focus to concentrate on the subtle color shifts and spot the peas of appropriate size. The colors are beautiful and I tried to imagine how to paint such a jumble, without any clear focus or line-of-sight. Could it be just an abstract pattern? And years ago I began a needlepoint pillow blocked in by the quite famous textile man Kaffe Fassett. It’s almost done, as you can see, folded up waiting for me to have the patience to make it into a pillow. IMG_3447_4_1I think I started it in 1990. I’ll stick with less complexity for my paintings, at least for now.

Picking peas was very meditative and internal. The birds were whistling and screeching. I heard small motors and insects. But as I got toward the end of the row the sound of cars whizzing by on Arnold Drive, over arched most everything else. I wanted to turn around…maybe I had enough? Well, that could be what the crew thinks too because at the end of the row, I IMG_3445_3_1found a bonanza of perfect peas. I picked more from that 2 feet at the end of the row than on the rest of the shoulder-height 200′ row.

We’ll have another “Easter” when my mom is ready. Pretend Easter is a good idea. Now we have Sunday to celebrate our almost anniversary!

The asparagus is right next to the peas. Two rows of have just been set as the rest of the field goes to frond.

The asparagus is right next to the peas. Two rows of have just been set as the rest of the field goes to frond.


Pushin’ in February

Peas

Peas

So much is happening. The weather, the great dictator of what happens on the farm, has been very generous to us. It must have been over 70 degrees F. today. Beautiful. We’re planting spinach, turnips, radishes, lettuce, pea seeds in the field. Once planted, some are covered. We may plant beets and carrots this week.

Tomato seedlings

Tomato seedlings

The greenhouse is starting to really fill up with freshly planted flats, some covered, some not. The first planting of tomatoes have blasted out of their flats and pushed the remay into puffy pillows. So have the peppers. Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbages, fennel and onions were all started in the greenhouse flats last week or before.Greenhouse

Lettuce, chard, kales and collard are all being transplanted. Once in the field, they are also covered to insure against wild weather swings. We hope they will feel secure enough to take off.

Covered beds and open ground

Covered beds and open ground

Sprinklers

Running the water

The irrigation system is engaged with the warm dry weather. The final bit of field turning is almost complete as the pipes are hooked up.Pipe

There is an experiment in the new field with planting oats, wheat and barley, side-by-side. Which will be the most beneficial to this soil? We’ll see.

Wheat, Barley and Oats

Wheat, Barley and Oats

The Farm Stand signposts are all that remain of last summer's bounty.

The signposts are all that remain of last summer’s Farm Stand.

Brussels sprouts, covered bed and beyond the farm

Brussels sprouts, covered bed and beyond the farm

 

Daikon radishes are being harvested out of the cover crop between the rows of regrowing artichokes.

Daikon radishes are being harvested out of the cover crop between the rows of regrowing artichokes.


Transitions

Many fields are moving from spring to summer crops.

The summer squash looks great! You can see where the variety changes from Raven (our green zucchini) to Gold Bar (the yellow), in the center left of the photo.

First tomatoes planted May 1st. This picture was taken May 3rd. Peppers and eggplant are under the covers beyond the tomatoes.

The tomatoes were staked May 11th and the covers have come off the peppers and eggplant.

Broccoli, fennel and spring onions.

May 3, looking like peak?

May 13, mowed between the rows.

Kinda gorgeous with kale, fennel and broccoli going to flower.


Late Spring

As the weather makes a shift, the farm is prepared. All the covers will come off the field crops in the next few days as 90 degree days are predicted next week. Finally!

This box has spinach, salad mix, arugula, a bag of oregano, a head of sangria (red butter lettuce), carrots, turnips, radishes, sugar snap peas, and a bunch of lacinato kale. So spring!

Our CSA started today and we are thrilled to try this new way to sell our vegetables. Most of our current members are familiar to me, but a “Farmers Choice” box of whatever is ready to pick up once a week will beautifully fit into households that want excellent, safe produce but have time constraints and are unable to attend either of our farmers’ markets. Those folks will find us. If you know anyone that might want such a box, let us know. e-mail: candied@vom.com.

Austin, Silvano and Servando pick lettuce, beyond the broccoli.

The basil is still under covers.

Fat fennel

Cherry tomatoes are flying along, in the greenhouse.

Basil in the greenhouse will be planted soon.

Paul works on a wheel hoe.

These English peas make for easy picking.


%d bloggers like this: